Project Management for the Cuneiform Project

Initially the project was to be carried out by two groups who would make separate plans, carry out practice, and capture at the library together. I was in Group 1. Group One Amanda Morse (Rep) Processing Seán Sourke Processing James Byrne 3D Printing Eleanor Obrien Digitization Aine McAdam Reporting (withdrew from the project) Michael Kurzmeier …

Cuneiform Tablet 2H

This is Cuneiform tablet 2H from the Russell Library Cuneiform Collection at St. Patrick’s College, Maynooth, Ireland. Dating from the Ur III period (ca. 2100-2000BC), it is an administrative tablet of Neo-Sumerian culture written in the Sumerian language. It has a combination of stylus and cylindrical seal impressions, the latter has figurative elements on both …

Two Spatial History Projects: 2D & 3D

Part One: Three-Dimensional Project The City and The Rising is an interactive website developed by Noho for Dublin Corporation to mark the centenary of the 1916 Rising. The aim of the site was described by the Lord Mayor of Dublin as “an online experience that is visually striking, emotionally engaging and highly memorable”. (TechCentral) So …

Are you prepared for your first digital aura?

Today in AFF601 we had the fantastically enthusiastic Sharon Healy discussing digital preservation. It was a topic foremost on my mind last night as I tried to locate some 2D and 3D spatial history projects from the course bibliography. It was proving hard to fine projects that were still online and still working! Project after …

Heritage in the age of digital reproduction

Reproductions of ‘original’ works have always been with us. With the coming of mechanical reproduction such as print and photography, however, the notion that a copy can somehow affect the status of the original was first postulated by Walter Benjamin in 1936 (II) . “Even the most perfect reproduction of a work of art is …

3D Representations of Cultural Heritage & Copyright

The emergent technologies of three-dimensional scanning and printing have become more than visualisation aids in recent years and are fast developing into powerful analysis techniques capable of directing new research avenues. Yet the visual appeal and accessibility of these technologies has also allowed cultural institutions to disseminate knowledge and encourage public engagement in cultural heritage …